Wednesday, May 27, 2015

“The Treasury Department believed in saving those at the top, and didn’t worry much about the rest of America,”

The newyorker has the goods.
Warren told me, “We were there to do oversight, and it made no difference to me whether there was a Democrat or a Republican in the White House. Our only consideration should be the American people, not whose feelings in government might get hurt or whose political careers might be advanced.” Warren said her work on the panel studying Treasury’s practices taught her that Obama’s economic advisers were even more beholden to the banks than she had understood. “The Treasury Department believed in saving those at the top, and didn’t worry much about the rest of America,” she said.
Warren was well known in liberal policy circles, but Geithner had never heard of her until she became his overseer and summoned him to testify. He felt that she was much better at complaining about what she was against than at articulating what she was for. In his recent memoir, “Stress Test,” Geithner calls Warren “one of our most ardent and eloquent liberal critics” but chastises her for not offering him more specific policy suggestions during the financial crisis.
Warren quickly realized that, although she could hold hearings and write reports, her panel had no more authority than her old blue-ribbon bankruptcy commission. Those writing the new rules for financial regulation had the real power. Warren thought she had a chance to get a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau into the emerging law, so she stopped excoriating Geithner, and met with Fine, the bank lobbyist. She knew that public opposition to the protection bureau on his part could kill it.

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